Supporting the Reduction of Hazardous Exposures

Hazardous Materials PhotoMany drugs pose significant risks to those who prepare, transport, administer and dispose of them.1  As a result, healthcare professionals who work with hazardous drugs unintentionally put their health and safety on the line every day. 
 
The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) has identified a number of medications as hazardous. Depending on the agent, exposure can lead to cancer, fertility problems, genetic damage and/or birth defects.1 To greatly reduce the risks associated with handling these drugs, The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends the use of closed-system transfer devices (CSTDs).1 
 
We recognize the risks you face on the job and our dedication to your well-being guides our every step.  That’s why we offer solutions that are engineered specifically to help promote safe handling of hazardous materials. These include:

Delivery Systems
Safety Packaging 
  • Onco-Tain™ Vials 
    These reinforced, shatter-resistant vials with PVC bottoms are washed prior to shrink-wrapping in an exterior sleeve to help provide maximum protection.
We take your risk of exposure to hazardous drugs seriously and we are committed to supporting healthcare facilities in adopting practices for safer preparation and administration of hazardous parenteral medications.


Minimizing Latex Allergy Risks

When it comes to the risk of latex allergies, we want to provide you with options. We offer a broad range of products made with Isoprene, a synthetic rubber that has the functional properties of latex, but helps to reduce the risk of allergic reactions in latex-sensitive individuals. 
 
Our product lines that feature Isoprene include: 

  1. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. NIOSH Alert: Preventing Occupational Exposures to Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Health Care Settings. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; 2004. NIOSH publication 2004-165. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2004-165/.  Accessed March 12, 2012.