Healthcare

Healthcare Associated Infections

Making Inroads Against Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs)

HAIs are infections acquired during the course of receiving treatment for other conditions within a healthcare setting.1 While tremendous strides have been made in the fight against HAIs, there is still a great deal of work to be done.
 
At Hospira, we recognize that HAIs are an important public health issue. That’s why we're committed to partnering with you to reduce HAIs, which can translate into improved patient safety and satisfaction, lower costs and increased quality of care at your facility. Our broad portfolio of products addresses infection-related contamination in a variety of ways. We can help you:
  • Reduce the risk for HAIs through our premium LifeShield™ product line, prefilled products and other offerings
  • Treat HAIs with our range of generic injectable anti-infectives
  • Monitor HAIs using advanced clinical surveillance technologies

HAIs by the Numbers

Approximately one in every 20 inpatients acquires a healthcare-associated infection (HAI) annually.2   Each year, HAIs cost the U.S. healthcare system billions of dollars and claim thousands of lives.2
 
Just four specific infection types account for more than 80% of all HAIs:3
  • Surgical site infections (SSIs)
  • Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs)
  • Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs)
  • Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAPs) 
The startling statistics illustrate why the issue has drawn so much attention — and prompted sweeping actions to remedy the situation — on the national and state levels. For example, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in 2008 reduced payment for certain hospital-acquired conditions, including several types of healthcare-associated infections.4 In addition, 28 states and the District of Columbia require reporting of HAIs using the Centers for Disease Control’s (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance system.5
 
We understand these and other pressures you face on the HAI front. That’s why we offer practical, cost-effective options for taking on the challenge — and protecting your patients.
  1. Centers for Disease Control website. HAIs – The Burden. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/HAI/burden.html. Accessed May 23, 2012.
  2. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services website. Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI). Available at http://www.hhs.gov/ash/initiatives/hai/index.html. Accessed May 23, 2012.
  3. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality website. Patient Safety Primers – Health-Care Associated Infections. Available at http://psnet.ahrq.gov/primer.aspx?primerID=7. Accessed May 2, 2012.
  4. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Letter to state Medicaid directors. July 31, 2008. Available at http://downloads.cms.gov/cmsgov/archived-downloads/SMDL/downloads/SMD073108.pdf. Accessed May 24, 2012.
  5. Centers for Disease Control website. State-based HAI Prevention - Tracking. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/hai/state-based/tracking.html. Accessed May 24, 2012.